Featured Veteran: Joseph Otho Goble

How many of us can imagine reaching seventy-five years old? What about one hundred? Joseph Otho Goble has passed both at one hundred and one years old! Goble was a Marine veteran serving in WWII as a platoon sergeant, and was awarded the Silver Star for combat actions on Guadalcanal.

Stacy Pearsall

Goble’s journey of enlisting was not easy. The year was 1940. At twenty-seven years of age, he was working in Washington, D.C., and knew he was going to be drafted soon. Therefore, he went to his home state of North Carolina to join the military. “I went to Charlotte to join the Marines,” Goble recalls, “They (the recruiters) said, ‘We’re sorry, we allow six Marines here, six Marines in Nashville, six Marines in Winston-Salem, and six Marines in Raleigh, that’s all.’ ” The Charlotte recruiting office was full, and so was the Nashville’s. “They called Winston-Salem, and that office said, ‘Come over real quick, we have one opening’. I then had to take the car back to my dad’s, get on the bus, and by the time I got to Winston, they had already filled it.” He remembers it was almost closing time at the Winston-Salem recruiting office, and the recruiter said he would call Raleigh. There were two openings left. “For God’s sake, put Goble down,” the recruiter exclaimed. At eight o’clock the next morning, he enlisted in his requested branch of service.

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“You’re handsome,” Pearsall says to Goble. “Thank you.” Goble replies modestly.

When Stacy Pearsall asked if he would talk about the events surrounding his Silver Star, he gave us all a laugh. “You want to know about it now??” Goble genuinely asks. “Yes sir, please,” Pearsall says with a smile. “Well it’s sort of a long story.” “I’ve got time for you.” Stacy says.

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Goble receiving the Silver Star in 1942

“We were in battle across the Guadalcanal (Tenaru) River behind the Japanese where another battalion was on the other side of the river where they were holding the Japanese off over there, and we went behind the Japanese,” he explains. “We were told to push right into the Japs from that side, so I was to take my opportunity to the right and the rest of the battalion to the left. So, there was only about twenty-six of us. I lost two men going over the valley.”

Stacy Pearsall
Joseph’s Marine Corps portrait taken upon enlistment.

“I was placing my men twenty-five steps apart because we didn’t have enough to cover,” he continues. “Machine guns started to fire from the jungles, so I got one of my men who had rifle grenades and went where we could look over the jungles’ ridge to see where the machine guns were coming from. We fired several rifle grenades, and I could watch them go up and back down again. That’s when we didn’t hear anymore machine guns, and I went back to check on my men. One of them yelled, ‘Russ is hit, Russ is hit! (WR Russ)’ [unfortunately, Russ passed away before returning home]. I went up to Russ, and I thought he was hit in the stomach. We started to drag him back, and I probably got from here to that wall over there (approximately ten to fifteen feet) when I got hit.”

Stacy Pearsall
Stacy speaks with Joseph about his experiences in the Pacific during WWII.

“I was trying to figure out whose foot I was laying on,” remembers Goble. “The corpsman got up to me and I said, ‘Whose foot am I laying on?’. He says, ‘That’s your foot.’ This foot (his left) was all the way back up here (points to the back of his head), and he dressed my leg and straightened it out with splints and gave a couple shots in the arm. Before I went to sleep, I could look out over the ocean and I said, ‘Whose ships are those out there? I’m counting 13 ships: two large ships and the rest destroyers.’ Someone said, ‘There’s no ships out there.’ I said, ‘There are!’ When I woke up, they had all the wounded from the battalion and put me on a boat to the hospital. That’s what I remember ….. Sure enough that night, thirteen ships came in, and it was one of the biggest ship battles they had. Can you figure that out?”

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Goble has one friend left from his unit who lives in Georgia now. He calls him about once a month. After the service, he was told to get a job sitting down or else he would be standing with a cane.He ended up becoming a jeweler for many years. He was also told he would have his leg removed before his 50th birthday. Obviously, that person was incorrect. He was an avid hiker until the age of ninety-five. Even being over one hundred years old, he still works out on cardio machines and is a prime example of, “What’s your excuse?”.

Stacy Pearsall
Des’ola takes the opportunity to make a selfie with an American hero, Joseph Goble.

Special thanks goes to those who made it possible in meeting and having the honor to photograph Goble.

Stacy Pearsall

“Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don’t have that problem.” ― Ronald Reagan

© Veteran portrait by Stacy L. Pearsall, story by Des’ola Mecozzi

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